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How to deal with writer’s block


 

When writers sit down to write, they don’t start writing in a flow. It takes time because creativity also needs time. Even writers can get exhausted. A mind has to take in information, process it and then give out unique and interesting results. Sometimes you don’t find any external or internal motivation or inspiration of any kind to keep moving further in your story. Even great thinkers and writers of their everlasting classic era, like F.Scott. Fitzgerald had a brief stint of writer’s block. Never get disheartened, just give yourself some time off. These points would be beneficial if you just have a glance at it:

 

1) Dare to dream:

Think of situations that you had never dared to. Make those things possible in your dream that you had never expected of this life. Are women ruling the world? Just discovered a hidden but well-developed animal society? It is your dream, make anything possible!

 

2) Making changes:

 Some researches show that changing the time of the day when you sit and write, the place where you write, the environment, the people, the conditions etc are vital factors in determining your productivity levels as a writer.

 

3) Digital detoxification:

It is pretty darn sub-heading, isn’t it? Not so much. It simply means that you have to keep your mind free and your eyes away from any online content. Just allow yourself to roam around, be in the present, feel the real-life sink in and the virtual life fade away. Or in other words— just daydream.

 

4) Writing Marathon: 

Or mostly known as freewriting. It means to keep writing without stopping for anything— be it grammar, vocabulary, structural irregularities or even the sentences to make sense! This will help you push that hard and rocky block aside and moving on with your story or any write-up that you are stuck with. Simply let the rules hang around the corner and forget them for once.

 

5) Monetary talks:

 The motive of life is to survive and money is essential for survival in the 21st-century world. If you are an already published writer then the deadlines must already be set by your publisher for your next novel. But, if you are a writer who is just finding his/her place in the field, then you also should take care that you manage to have some day job, so that you don’t have to stress about the financial aspects too much. I know J.K Rowling is an inspiration, someone who rose from rags to riches. But only look at the hard work she did— no two writer’s life is same. Make your decisions wisely.

 

6) Don’t just run away: 

While taking a break is a good option that many writers would have suggested to you. But, if you take a break every five minutes, you will never have the patience to think of ideas. Writing commands patience and vigour.

 

7) Don’t Beat yourself up: 

If you are stuck, it is a part of the gamble that you have got yourself into. Every artist, whether it is a painter, composer or a writer, will need some time and influence to ponder over and bring out the best of what they’ve got.

 

8) Use of invention strategies:

Did you know that Agatha Christie used to sit in her bathtub, eating an apple and going through crime photos to dig up novel ideas for her story? Likewise, you could also create new ways of your own which can help you to keep your vehicle  moving.

 

9) Try writing prompts:

Yes, you already have a story and you don’t need any external help. But just having a quick glance of any writing prompt page could get you to clear your fogged imagination and you will breeze through that phase of indecisiveness.

 

10) Promodoro technique: 

Giving a strict time limit could tick off your creative juices making you the master of imagination! Yeah, you heard that write. This is a very simple technique— all you have to do is, just set a timer for either twenty-five or if you take a round figure, for thirty minutes and start writing without stopping till the alarm goes off. The language could also change. Sometimes writing in the first person also gives a sense of belonging or relating to the character as your friend.

 

Some easy solutions to stop yourself from various distractions:

 

1) Turn the internet off. If you tend to look at the incoming notifications and watch more random videos. Then turn the wifi off and make it as difficult a process, for the net to turn back on, as possible

2) Divide your work into parts, set a deadline for each individual part. Also, try giving yourself rewards, or in some cases— punishments like I won’t eat sweets for a week if I don’t finish this work before deadline etc.

3) Talk with people, whoever are comfortable with— it could be your friend or tutor or even a family member. Writing is a lonely profession, so talking to someone about it helps you destress before picking speed with your writing again.

4) Many a time, writers tend to start on some topic or genre that does not interest them but they think that it is the best option because of myriad reasons like it is the most popular genre; if it’s a topic to write on, maybe it is the easiest one or your fellow writers are more inclined towards it. Remember, you can only narrate those stories that you have through— in books that you have read, the experiences you have gained or the feelings that engulfed you. 

 

This article and many others of such kind are reminders that you are not fighting alone, so many writers are right now sitting in their own space, fighting their battles with the monstrous writer’s block. Writer’s block is nothing but a fancy term for various levels of fears, doubts and anxieties that you, as a writer face while writing. Always remember, you have failed to write because you are at least trying. Nothing is permanent, if your concentration is not that strong, so is the case with your loss of interest, it won’t last long either. And many hurdles will come your way but don’t ever consider it as the last ray of hope, every minute of your life brings some new and unknowable surprises— many of them could be bad but most of them are filled with joyful goodies!

 

Have you any views to share and help all your fellow writers? Do share in the comments section below. Happy writing!

 

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